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SSM: Style.State.of.Mind

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endofdayz:

Karyn Washington, founder of the For Brown Girls blog, has died of an apparent suicide, reports MadameNoire.com. The influential blogger was only 22 years old.
Washington’s blog celebrated self-love, particularly among dark-skinned women. She also launched the #DarkSkinRedLip project after rapper A$AP Rocky suggested that darker-skinned women should avoid crimson lips. Following her lead, thousands of women of color posted photos of themselves proudly rocking red lips using the hashtag.
While working earnestly to empower women of all races and colors, Washington was also dealing with personal struggles. According to a friend, she had been battling depression and was also finding it hard to deal with the loss of her mother.
http://www.bet.com/news/fashion-and-beauty/2014/04/11/for-brown-girls-blog-creator-dies-of-apparent-suicide.html
Black women, who often shoulder so much burden and to admit any weakness of the mind and body is to be considered defective. Vulnerability is not allowed. Tears are discouraged. Victims are incessantly blamed. We are hard on our women, and suffer as a result.
When your community tells you that you’re better off praying than seeking the advice of medical professionals and medication, you feel shame when you feel your mind is breaking. There is no safe place. To admit to any mental frailty is to invite scorn and mockery.
Mental Illness is Real
R.I.P.

endofdayz:

Karyn Washington, founder of the For Brown Girls blog, has died of an apparent suicide, reports MadameNoire.com. The influential blogger was only 22 years old.

Washington’s blog celebrated self-love, particularly among dark-skinned women. She also launched the #DarkSkinRedLip project after rapper A$AP Rocky suggested that darker-skinned women should avoid crimson lips. Following her lead, thousands of women of color posted photos of themselves proudly rocking red lips using the hashtag.

While working earnestly to empower women of all races and colors, Washington was also dealing with personal struggles. According to a friend, she had been battling depression and was also finding it hard to deal with the loss of her mother.

http://www.bet.com/news/fashion-and-beauty/2014/04/11/for-brown-girls-blog-creator-dies-of-apparent-suicide.html

Black women, who often shoulder so much burden and to admit any weakness of the mind and body is to be considered defective. Vulnerability is not allowed. Tears are discouraged. Victims are incessantly blamed. We are hard on our women, and suffer as a result.

When your community tells you that you’re better off praying than seeking the advice of medical professionals and medication, you feel shame when you feel your mind is breaking. There is no safe place. To admit to any mental frailty is to invite scorn and mockery.

Mental Illness is Real

R.I.P.

(via devoutfashion)

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eLearning Africa 2014 / International Conference on ICT for Development, Education and Training.

dynamicafrica:

The eLearning Africa “Through your Lens” Photo Competition is back this year in its fifth edition. Under the theme of “Social Africa: building bridges through ICT”, budding photographers are invited to submit snapshots depicting how ICT is enhancing the way individuals and communities in Africa live, learn, cooperate and connect.

Beyond being an entertaining distraction, new technologies also play a social and developmental role in modern societies.

We’re looking for photographs that show how ICT can foster integration, inclusion and diversity: How, where and why does technology bring people together? How are marginalised and excluded groups supported by ICT? How does technology open up access to learning across the Continent?

We want you to show us how communication tools and information technologies can build bridges and foster relationships between people!

The deadline is April 14th, 2014

This year the photo competition is moving to the eLearning Africa Facebook Fan Page. To take part in it, please click here. You can always view all the entries here.

Late entries will not be considered. Please note that entries must be approved internally before being uploaded, therefore your submitted photo will not be immediately viewable on the eLearning Africa Facebook Page and website. The winners will be informed by email a few weeks after the closing date at the latest.

 The winners will be picked by an expert panel of judges and a public vote:

  • 1st prize: a tablet PC
  • 2nd prize: a digital camera
  • 3rd prize: a MP3 player
  • Public vote winner: a digital camera

The prize can neither be transferred nor paid out in cash.

The 10 best photos will be featured in an exhibition at eLearning Africa 2014 in Kampala.

Should you have any questions, feel free to contact us at Gregory.vespasien@icwe.net

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dynamicafrica:

Bongiwe Walaza’s 2013 Collection Re-Fashions A New Image for Shweshwe Fabric.

Not sure why it’s taken me so long to come across the work of South African designer Bongiwe Walaza but I recently did and subsequently fell in love with her latest collection that was showcased at the Mercedes Benz Africa Fashion Week 2013.

The award winner designer founded her eponymous label in 2003 and describes her line as ‘Afro inspired haute couture’. Using western feminine silhouettes, Walaza makes use of Shweshwe textiles - a printed dyed cotton used by various Southern African ethnic groups believed to be named after Lesotho’s King Moshoeshoe I who was gifted with the fabric by the French missionaries in the 1840s.

It is also known as “German print”,sejeremane in Sotho, and ujamani in Xhosa, after 19th century German and Swiss settlers who imported the blaudruck (“blue print”) fabric for their clothing and helped entrench it in South African culture. [x]

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All Africa, All the time.

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ugomozie:

Shoutout to All the Moms & Pops out there who are raising there kids and not just letting them “grow up” ❤️

ugomozie:

Shoutout to All the Moms & Pops out there who are raising there kids and not just letting them “grow up” ❤️

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dynamicafrica:

Meet 23-year-old talented South African mover Tarryn Alberts, your new favourite dancer.

Hailing from Eldorado Park, Johannesburg, the dynamic super-cute dynamite dancer with a proactive outlook on life combines both feminine and masculine elements in both her style of dance and her aesthetic.

Dancing since she was four years old, she’s a headstrong and highly motivated individual who continuously finds herself shuttling between the crazy world of professional dancing and all the perks it brings, and the surroundings of her daily life that fuels both her passion and talent for dance.

This microdoc is part of an on-going series that showcases South Africa’s most vibrant and artistic street culture scene, brought about through a collaboration with Sprite and The FADER as part of its Obey You collective.

Watch a video of Tarryn dancing.

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All Africa, All the time.

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yagazieemezi:

1953: How I Wear My Crown

Often recognized for her face alone, Folasade Titilayo Adeso is not just a model or any photographer’s muse; she is also an artist whose creative vision transcends various mediums. Born in Abeokuta, Nigeria, raised in Canada, Folasade is currently based in New York City; the ideal place to fuel passion and dreams. A talented graphic designer, she recently embarked on a journey to build a legacy for her father who passed away in 2012.

Y: What inspired 1953?

Folasade: My father passed away in 2012 and coming from a family of all girls, it hit me that we would not be able to pass on my father’s name the way men can. When I went home in 2013 I was continuously greeted by family and friends who would say, “Welcome to your father’s land” and that stuck with me. 1953 is the year my father was born and the year that Nigeria became my father’s land.

Y: Tell us more about the head-wraps.

Folasade: Growing up, I would watch my mother tie her head-wraps so intricately on a daily basis. At the age of 22 I started learning to tie my own head-wraps by watching her. Being so far away from Nigeria, wearing head-wraps allow me to feel more connected to home.  It makes me feel so regal and proud not to mention that they are a colorful addition to whatever outfit I may have on! While walking though the market-place with my aunt in Nigeria, I was overwhelmed by the array of bright fabric splayed out in front of me in the stalls. I then realized that I could share how head-wraps made me feel with other women. It’s not just a piece of fabric. It’s a piece of my home. It’s me walking though the market place thinking of the women, my customers and what they would like. My mother has handed down to me some of her own wraps and I know just how long their can last. My wraps are for women to keep and treasure for years to come.

Keep reading + more pictures

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Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

(via devoutfashion)

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